Solutions, what else?  

It feels like the future of agriculture meets Belgium, Leuven. 

At the #ICYA2017 conference slowly, slowly all participants are getting to know-each other. After some really informative trainings and a lot interactive workshops, we are starting to warm up.

The participants, representing over 25 countries and a variety of different ages, cultures and academic backgrounds, have begun a three-days passionate journey to find solutions. Solutions for emerging problems which we are already facing and will face in the future.

What are those major problems we are faced with? On one hand, it is hard to stay on one common line, keeping focussed on the central theme. On the other hand, it is not easy to decide how to tackle the issue of how sustainable crop production should be, how students and farmers can connect, or how we can reduce food waste in restaurants.

We’ve discovered that finding solutions is not that easy. Even for a gifted and enthusiastic group as ours. Why? Because while addressing a problem we realise that the addressed problem has more than one side to it. Moreover, trying to solve problems in such a multi-national team, is not always straight forward.

It might sound like a bit of a paradox, but it is sometimes even difficult to create solutions for so many problems.  Yet the International Youth and Agriculture (ICYA) is a milestone that helps us to tackle crucial challenges in diverse areas with different cultural perspectives, more easily.

“We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we created them.” Albert Einstein

Blogpost by Deniz Onaral, #ICYA2017 Social Reporter -  denizwrites@gmail.com  

Picture courtesy of Evan Dennis @unsplash.com  

This post is part of the live coverage during the #ICYA2017 – The International Conference for Youth in Agriculture, organised by IAAS (The International Association of Students in Agricultural and Related Sciences).   This post is written by one of our social reporters, as part of their training on social reporting, and represents the author’s views only.  

The #ICYA2017 social reporting project is supported by GFAR, the Global Forum on Agricultural Research.